Sue

The first time I ever saw her, she was floating around the room like a butterfly. It was one of those teen parties, at someone’s home sans parents. A few of the boys had, somehow, bought and brought a few six-packs. Twenty or so young people, naive, parochial, and feeling the promise of school’s out and summer’s in. 

She was beautiful, crystal blue-eyes, long black hair, and a body that boys described as a brick shit house.  

Sue moved around the room as if she was somewhere else, and after knowing her for thirty years–I candidly say–she was.